In Photos: Soldiers Risk Their Lives to Aid Florence Victims

September 21, 2018

 

Soldiers continue to help evacuate residents in flood-ravaged communities along North Carolina’s coastal plains days after Hurricane Florence made landfall.

 

Army personnel have rescued a total of 372 residents and evacuated another 47 in both North and South Carolina, while more than 9,000 soldiers are supporting the hurricane relief efforts.

 

The National Guard conducted about 125 rescue missions alone on Tuesday, said Army Lt. Col. Matt DeVivo, a North Carolina National Guard public affairs officer. He said water levels continue to stay at dangerously high levels, and in some areas they have even risen.

 

DeVivo said he expects the National Guard to continue operations  possibly through the weekend. More than 3,100 North Carolina Guardsmen remain engaged in rescue operations, along with about 350 National Guardsmen from neighboring states.

 

“We’re not going anywhere anytime soon,” DeVivo said. “Until we know the rivers have crested and the waters start to recede and communities can try to get back to some semblance of normalcy. Thousands have been displaced. And it’s going to be a challenge, but we’re ready to support the state well after the waters have receded.”

 

National Guard helicopters, working in conjunction with state and federal agencies, have delivered more than 61,000 pounds of relief supplies.

 

A South Carolina Army National Guardsman with the 1053rd Transportation Company carries a girl to a military vehicle after her family was trapped inside their vehicle by flood waters in Hamer, S.C., Sept. 18, 2018.

Army photo by Sgt. Brian Calhoun

 

Soldiers shuttle people and their pets across high water on U.S. Route 17 between Wilmington and Bolivia, N.C., Sept. 18, 2018, while supporting Hurricane Florence relief efforts.

National Guard photo by Sgt. Odaliska Almonte

 

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Members of Coast Guard Shallow-Water Response Boat Team 3 rescue pets stranded by floodwaters caused by Tropical Storm Florence, Riegelwood, N.C., Sept. 16, 2018.

Coast Guard photo

 

South Carolina National Guardsmen transfer diesel fuel into tanker trucks in North Charleston, S.C., Sept. 10, 2018, while preparing to assist with Hurricane Florence response efforts.

Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Brian Calhoun

 

US Customs and Border Protection, Air and Marine Operations (AMO), from Tucson, Arizona, rescue two adults and a dog from the Cape Fear waterway while on a Search and Rescue (SAR) Mission.

US Customs and Border Protection photo by Jaime Rodriguez Sr.

 

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Marines help a resident get off the back of a military vehicle during evacuations due to flooding from Tropical Storm Florence, Jacksonville, N.C., Sept. 15, 2018.

Marine Corps photo by Pfc. Nello Miele

 

Robert Simmons Jr. and his kitten "Survivor" are rescued from floodwaters after Hurricane Florence dumped several inches of rain in the area, Sept. 14, 2018 in New Bern, N.C.

Andrew Carter/via AP

 

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Members assigned to Emergency Operation Center Brunswick, North Carolina, work together to pull a large dog they rescued off of a medium tactical vehicle Sept. 17, 2018.

US Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Jon-Paul Rios.

 

Volunteers from all over North Carolina help rescue residents and their pets from their flooded homes during Hurricane Florence September 14, 2018 in New Bern, North Carolina. Chip Somodevilla—Getty Images

 

Disclaimer: The appearance of US Department of Defense (DoD) visual information on this website does not imply or constitute DoD endorsement.

 

 

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